Regional Migration Report

Regional Migration Report: Eastern Europe

Eastern European countries, i.e. Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine, share a common land border with the European Union. This border divides nations, communities, families and while the border has moved, through European history, the people on either side rarely have. They, in fact, built strong cultural and personal ties in the periods of living together, ties that endured subsequent divisions by state lines. These ties influence the ongoing mobility of Eastern Europeans today. The present report sheds some light on the various issues concerning migration and mobility in the region. It gathers the fruit of over two years work done by the CARIM-East network of correspondents and proposes a collection of informative chapters on various migration topics, treated from three perspectives: demographic, legal and socio-political.

 

The front page of the paper "Regional Migration Report: Eastern Europe"

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You can find a full description of the Migration Report in the EUI’s Research Repository.

Regional migration report: South Caucasus

Human mobility in the South Caucasus is a dynamic phenomenon that has been changing social, economic and even political realities there. The three countries considered in the present report, namely, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, have been through very different post-communist transitions, which have influenced the conditions for short- and long-term migration to, from and across their territories. South Caucasus is a region of relatively high instability with frozen conflicts and constant geopolitical struggles. Each political decision naturally influences migration dynamics: the volume, the character and, of course, the direction. The present report testifies to this ever changing reality and offers a solid basis for understanding its dynamics. It gathers the fruits of over two years work carried out by the CARIM-East network of correspondents. It proposes a collection of informative chapters on various migration topics, developed from three perspectives: demographic, legal and socio-political.

 

The front page of the paper "Regional migration report: South Caucasus"

↓ Read it online ↓ Download the pdf

 

You can find a full description of the Migration Report in the EUI’s Research Repository.

 

Regional Migration Report: Russia and Central Asia

Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Russian Federation has become one of the most important destinations for immigration in the world. It is also a very particular case of a destination country in which two types of flows have shaped the character of immigration. Massive waves of Russians returning to their ancestral (or actual) motherland from other republics dominated throughout the 1990s, diminishing in 2000s. At the same time, the growing Russian economy started to attract immigrant workers from other parts of the post-Soviet space, especially from less developed central Asian countries, namely Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. Nowadays, they are the main working migrant group, whose presence is contested on cultural grounds. The Eurasian migration system is thus a central theme for migration research in the region. This report proposes a deep comparative analysis of the place of Russia and Kazakhstan (Russia’s emerging economic rival) in the Eurasian migration system. The analysis is accompanied by an analysis of data collection in Russia and the development of Russia’s migration policy.

 

The front page of the paper "Regional Migration Report: Russia and Central Asia;

↓ Read it online ↓ Download the pdf

 

You can find a full description of the Migration Report in the EUI’s Research Repository.